Brittany Murphy, Motherhood, and Me

What I'm learning about love and sorrow.
1 / 2

Brittany Murphy, Motherhood, and Me

What I’m learning about love and sorrow.

-April Daniels Hussar

Brittany Murphy

The other day, when I heard about Brittany Murphy’s tragic death, I felt more than shock. At 32, Brittany was only a year younger than me. But my reaction was a maternal one, the reaction of someone who has a daughter: I felt so, so sorry for her mother.

Read The Year-Round Gift

Although I’m the mom of a 6-year-old girl, I’m not used to thinking of myself as especially motherly – except when it comes to my own daughter, of course. If I’m out in the city with a girlfriend, or lusting after ridiculously expensive shoes, I can still feel like the 24-year-old I once was, with the world ahead of me and no one to worry about except myself.

Lately, though, my life has been marked by moments that show me how much the world of mothers and daughters – all mothers and daughters – has come to matter to me. I read Twilight and felt concerned for Bella, thinking that Edward every mother’s worst nightmare. I can’t possibly go see The Lovely Bones, because it deals with the violent death of a child. In these moments I’m suddenly reminded that I live on the other side of a great divide, the divide between my post-adolescence and my motherhood, and that the way I look at the world has been forever changed.

Brittany’s death disturbed me not only because her life was cut short, or because her mother is just beginning a journey of grief that will last years, if not forever. Her death also taps into my greatest fear, the source of my most grown-up anxiety: that I’m responsible for bringing another person into the world, and teaching her how to be strong, how to protect and love herself, and how to recognize and avoid the world’s dark corners and potential pitfalls. And that I might not do it right.

I love being a mommy, but it’s terrifying. I don’t have a son, so I don’t know what the particular fears are that come with having a boy. But I know that trying to shepherd a little girl through a world that so often seems designed to chew them up and spit them out can seem like an almost superhuman task.


follow BettyConfidential on... Pinterest


Read More About...
Related Articles...

4 thoughts on “Brittany Murphy, Motherhood, and Me

  1. So sad and so true. Once you are a mother, you start to see everything through that lens, for better or for worse. Hopefully, it makes us more compassionate people. The trick, is to balance our need to protect our children with their need to explore and experience life. We are there to pick up the pieces when the exploration does not go well but we must continue to encourage. So terrible for Brittany Murphy’s mother.

  2. I felt exactly the same way when Michael Jackson died. Not because I was a huge fan, but I could not stop thinking about his mother. At one time he was her sweet little boy and as parents we never forget that. Others will forget but mothers never do.

  3. I felt exactly the same way when Michael Jackson died. Not because I was a huge fan, but I could not stop thinking about his mother. At one time he was her sweet little boy and as parents we never forget that. Others will forget but mothers never do.

Leave a Reply

top of page jump to top