See YOU Run

The Tipping List See YOU Run How to start running -Julie Ryan Evans Do you ever drive by runners and feel a pang of jealousy, wishing you could be out there burning all those calories and sailing on a runner’s high? Do you also make statements like, “I’m just not a runner”? Well, chances are [...]

The Tipping List

See YOU Run

How to start running

-Julie Ryan Evans

Do you ever drive by runners and feel a pang of jealousy, wishing you could be out there burning all those calories and sailing on a runner’s high? Do you also make statements like, “I’m just not a runner”?

Well, chances are you could be. And what a great, healthy habit to start at any age.

One of my greatest regrets in life is not starting running sooner. It would have been such a great stress reliever through high school, college, graduate school and so many life events in between. But it wasn’t until after I got married that a friend asked me to train for a marathon with her, that I really started (and, yes, when I decide to do something, I do it big!). We joined a training program, so we had some guided instruction, and I’ve been hooked since. But you don’t need anything that formal. The most important thing is to just get started as soon as possible.

Katherine Hobson at U.S. News & World Report recently interviewed John “the Penguin” Bingham, who writes a column for Runner’s World magazine. In the article, Bingham provides some great information for those thinking about starting to run, including the following:

How do you start running? Just, er, start running?
I recommend you begin by walking consistently for a couple of weeks, just to get moving and to make regular activity a habit. Then integrate a little bit of running – and I mean a little bit, like 30 to 45 seconds of running every four or five minutes of walking. Gradually, over time, change that. Some people may find they like to do mostly walking with some running, others will end up mostly running and still do some walking, and others will really like running and do that exclusively. But it will take longer than you think [to work up to running]. The people who try to run a 5K after three weeks of running are the ones who get hurt.

Okay, what if you’ve worked up to a bit of a running habit, but your
knees ache afterward?
Pain is never a good thing. It’s an indication that you’re doing more than your body can handle. If you had a dog that was limping around, you wouldn’t make him go out for a run. It’s the same with people. We think we have to push through the pain, and that’s just crazy. There’s the feeling of honest fatigue that comes with effort. And there’s also the feeling that indicates the onset of injury. Probably the most difficult thing for us is to distinguish between the two. If you’re hurting, do what you’d do for a dog with a sore paw: Rest.

To read the complete article, click here.

Tell us: Do you aspire to be a runner? What intimidates or excites you about running?


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