The Onion Wins Again

Woman to Women The Onion Wins Again Our choices matter By: Gina Anderson I’d rather do just about anything than shop for groceries. Shark diving, swimsuit scouting, behind-the-fridge cleaning. I marvel at people who skip down the aisles, carelessly weaving their way from Apple Jacks to Ziploc bags. Especially when I don’t know the difference […]

Woman to Women

The Onion Wins Again

Our choices matter

By: Gina Anderson

I’d rather do just about anything than shop for groceries. Shark diving, swimsuit scouting, behind-the-fridge cleaning. I marvel at people who skip down the aisles, carelessly weaving their way from Apple Jacks to Ziploc bags. Especially when I don’t know the difference between a clove of garlic and an onion.

In my recent attempt to “whip up something” allegedly painless for dinner, I decided to try my hand at a standard dish of pasta and light olive oil with chopped garlic. Surprisingly, two of the three items already lived in my 4-foot kitchen, so the thought of a grocery store stop-in for one little clove of garlic didn’t seem too dire.

It won’t bite.

Until it did. Right through my chef’s ego.  The “garlic” chomped away at my pitiful dreams of conquering the cookbook. The garlic was, of course, an onion. My embarrassing realization rang all the more true when I decided to make the best of it. And the infamous onion tears tumbled down my cheeks.

A split decision ruined my dinner. The onion had won this round.

Another split decision earlier in the week potentially ruined someone else’s dinner. A lovely woman stopped me on the street to ask which way was uptown. Just a simple “this way” or “that way” would have done. Like any city dweller though, I couldn’t be bothered. It was as if she’d asked a question so transparent, so obvious – like “What’s the most epic Lionel Richie tune?” (To which I would’ve answered with a resounding “Penny Lover”).

And I pointed toward “this way” … when I should have pointed toward “that.”

When I shook free from my disgruntled haze, I realized my blunder. But it was too late. The lovely lady was long gone.

She was long gone, and my wrong words probably made her long overdue to wherever and whomever she was darting off to. And I began thinking:

What if she was going to meet a blind date?
What if she was 20 minutes late, and he thought he was being stood up?
What if he left?
What if they both moved on with their lives, when really, they were supposed to move through life together?
What if the child they were to bear was meant to be the future leader of the free world, or even just the next Britney Spears?
What if I had changed the COURSE OF HISTORY?!?!

At this point, I realized that the only thing I probably needed to change was my crazy pill dosage. But all unfounded hysteria aside, the choice I made for that stranger on the street could have had a miniscule impact on her life, or at the very least, her night.

Affecting change through choice is what makes us, well, us. We join gyms to change our bodies; go to school to change our minds; take risks on people to hopefully change our hearts for the better – for the long run. We choose based on a faith in ourselves, a faith that we really do know what’s best for us.

And at the end of the day, that’s what we’re left with and need to live with: our choices. And know that even when we make the wrong one – even when we pick an onion from time to time – we won’t let it win.

What choices have you made that have made you who you are?bT_icon_16x16_trans.gif


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